Russia is launching missiles intended for nuclear strikes on Ukraine - the chief of intelligence

Photo: Photo from open sources
Kostiantyn Golubtsov

Kostiantyn Golubtsov

Published: July 04 2022 at 05:24 pm
Source: myukraineis.org

Budanov said that the occupiers use missiles that do not have the accuracy they would like, but they are satisfied that these strikes can be on the civilian population.

Russia currently uses long-range bomber aircraft with mostly old Soviet missiles.

The head of the Main Directorate of Intelligence of the Ministry of Defense Kyrylo Budanov told about this in an interview with RBC-Ukraine.

"What changed just after the change of their commander? This is the active mass use of long-range bomber aircraft, in particular, Tu-22M3 aircraft, which use mostly old Soviet missiles. These are not just old Soviet Kh-22 missiles, this is a missile that was designed to deliver nuclear weapons. strikes. That's why it has an accuracy of plus or minus a kilometer - it was generally normal. It is designed to deliver nuclear strikes, and they fire a conventional warhead. That's the whole answer. They basically don't have the accuracy they would like to have," - said Budanov.

He also added that he knows information about the number of these missiles, but it should not be shared.

"Will the missile threat remain with us for a long time? Unfortunately, it exists at this stage," he said.

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